Artist: Augusta Read Thomas

Augusta Read Thomas (born in 1964 in Glen Cove, New York) was the Mead Composer-in-Residence for Daniel Barenboim and Pierre Boulez with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, from 1997 through 2006. In 2007, her ASTRAL CANTICLE was one of the two finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in Music. Thomas has also been on the Board of Directors of the American Music Center (www.amc.net) since 2000, as well as on the boards and advisory boards of several chamber music groups. She was elected Chair of the Board of the American Music Center, a volunteer position that ran from 2005 to 2008. She is University Professor (one of six University Professors) at The University of Chicago. Augusta was MUSICALIVE Composer-in-Residence with the New Haven Symphony, a national residency program of The League of American Orchestras and Meet the Composer. Augusta has been on the Board of the ICE (International Contemporary Ensemble) for many years; is a member of the Advisory Committee of the Alice M. Ditson Fund; is on the Board of Trustees of The American Society for the Royal Academy of Music; is a Member of the Conseil Musical de la Foundation Prince Pierre de Monaco; and is on the Eastman School of Music’s National Council.

Born:
Glen Cove, NY

Based:
Chicago, IL

Recordings:
Words of the SeaSun ThreadsAugusta Read Thomas: Selected Works for Orchestra

Affiliations:

Chicago Symphony Orchestra

American Music Center

The University of Chicago

New Haven Symphony

International Contemporary Ensemble

The American Society for the Royal Academy of Music


Awards:

National Endowment for the Arts Award

American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters Award

Third Century Award

The Rudolph Nissim Award from ASCAP


Education:

Royal Academy of Music

Northwestern University

St. Paul's School

Yale University


Links:

Articles

2015

The Composer’s Way

21CM Q&A with Composers 2

Iconic composers Derek Bermel, Gabriel Kahane, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Steven Stucky, and Augusta Read Thomas talked with 21CM about their creative process, the glorious advantages and limitations of technology, and how being a composer has changed with the times, and remarkably stayed the same.

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