Author: Matt McBane

Matt McBane

Matt McBane has been described as “a natural composer, a fresh voice ” by Mark Swed in the Los Angeles Times and as having “a fantastic intuitive sense that is backed up by a serious amount of compositional craft” by Sequenza21.

Matt is the violinist and composer for his Brooklyn-based instrumental band, Build, described by New York Magazine as a "rocking post-classical quintet which takes inspiration from minimalist chamber music, instrumental rock, modal jazz, and more." Build has released two albums on New Amsterdam Records, both to widespread critical acclaim.

Matt is the Founder and Artistic Director of the Carlsbad Music Festival, a festival of “adventurous music by the beach” founded in 2004 and praised by the Los Angeles Times as “marvelously enlightening” and by the San Diego Union Tribune as “phenomenal.”

Matt has written for many ensembles and instrumentalists including the Calder Quartet, Meehan/Perkins Duo, Chatham Baroque, Wild Up, NOW Ensemble, and pianist Vicky Chow, and has appeared at Carnegie Hall, the Los Angeles Philharmonic Brooklyn Festival, the Bang on a Can Marathon (NYC), the Whitney Museum of Art, Le Poisson Rouge (NYC), and many others.

In 2015 Matt released two recordings: his 25-min suite “Drawn” for bluegrass string band recorded on Jake Schepps Quintet's “Entwined,” and “On and On and” based on the writings of John Muir and written for the San Diego-based chorus Sacra/Profana.

Articles

Tigue

TIGUE performing 0

Along with being fantastic live performers, a thing I like about Tigue is how well the group fits into and crosses over different paradigms of music creation and performance.

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Jake Schepps Quintet

Jake Schepps Quintet 0

Jake Schepps Quintet is a creative bluegrass group that has been commissioning composers to write new long-form works for the traditional bluegrass string band (fiddle, mandolin, banjo, guitar, bass).

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wild Up

wild Up performs in Santora Arts Building 0

When I think of wild Up, the first word I think of is “collaborative,” probably because its way of working is less like an orchestra and more like a chamber-group–cum-artist-collective.

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